Oct 122016
 

Bacon's Building
Bacon’s Building in stark sunlight and shadow

I took a walk from one end of the South End to the other on a glorious October day with my soon to be retired, five+ year-old Olympus E-P3. This post–the first of two from that walk–focuses on points south of Tremont, including SOWA, and features monochrome shots (straight B&W). The late afternoon sun provided long shadows and stark contrast which look so good in black and white. There are also some sun-dappled shots of a deteriorated SOWA block with an old, one-story electrical shop, as well as a very cool building around the corner near Peters Park with large receiving and loading doors labeled “IN” and “OUT” in the masonry above.

500 Roman Trattoria
500 Roman Trattoria

Leon Electric
Leon Electric

INOUT
On Harrison, the  IN  . . .  and  . . .  OUT  . . .

One Way
One Way
Sun on Ivy
Sun on Ivy

Oh, and I’m retiring the Olympus E-P3 in favor of a new, just ordered Olympus Pen F, an “impeccably beautiful shooting wonder” that “reinvents the rangefinder for m4/3,” which some have called “absolutely the most beautiful digital camera yet, trumping even what Leica can do” (no argument from me). I was afraid Olympus had abandoned the higher end Pen models and may not follow-up the E-P5, relegating the Pen line to the lower-end, fashionable E-PL line. I was hesitant to buy an Olympus OM model because I still use my Nikon DSLR (and myriad lenses) and want a slimmer alternative like the rangefinder-designed Pen cameras. So, I am thrilled that Olympus not only came out with a follow-up the E-P5, but took it up a notch and placed its high-end Pen camera alongside its OM cameras in terms of features and specs.  And having a camera that continues the Pen F legacy is a plus. Oh, and my Pen F was paid for, in large part, by some recent photo sales for a calendar. But that’s a post for next month. Cheers.

Aug 102012
 

under the interstate

 When I was back in my hometown last month, I set out in the morning armed with my Olympus Pen E-P3 and a few lenses (including a 7.5mm fisheye and 12mm f/2.0) on a day destined to hit 98 degrees F by mid afternoon. I headed to the Interstate 80 overpass near 33rd and Vinton Street in Omaha to shoot the long abandoned giant grain elevators now used as a canvas for urban art. While the Emerging Terrain silo art installation provided some fun subject matter (see photos in this prior post), I also had fun shooting the urban setting around the public art in B&W to emphasize the grittiness and decay of the old grain elevators and adjacent interstate overpass, as reflected in these shots.

sun, shadows and silos

 

Jan 112012
 
Keep Door Open


Keep Door Open

The sun also shines on the forgotten. I surreptitiously shot some abandoned structures in an urban lot a couple miles south of downtown Omaha when I was home over the holidays. I first thought this site was part of an old Army Quartermaster Depot Historic District, but I now think it’s just an old Utility District site a few blocks south. In any event, it’s a cluster of very interesting old buildings that looked great in the late afternoon December sun.

The bleak, snowless, winter terrain added to the desolate feel, but stark beauty, of this old place. I felt this mood was best matched by monochrome sepia processing for a look reminiscent of the bygone era when these structures were likely first built.  A couple shots, however, cried out for color:

And here’s a B&W shot of the sidewalk adjacent to the site. The neon sign attached to the building at the vanishing point is Piccolo’s, a very old school (“since 1933”) Italian steakhouse.

S 16 Spearmint
S 16 Spearmint