Matthew Ireland

Although I've always loved taking photos (and still have several old poloroid cameras), I began getting serious about photography after shooting jazz and hip hop shows with a digital camera in order to illustrate concert reviews I contributed (as a volunteer) to a Boston-focused blog (long since gone). That sparked a passion which has grown and evolved over the past 10 years. I now concentrate on nature, landscape, urban lifestyle and macro fine art photography. As an environmental and endangered species lawyer, I'm particularly inspired by wildlife and the natural environment. As a life-long lover of architecture, design and urban spaces, I often explore and photograph my city, Boston. You'll find examples of all these subjects in my galleries, along with images of Maine, Fire Island, Key West, Taos, Paris, New York, and my hometown, Omaha. I am also a Getty Images contributor. My Getty photos have been licensed around the world by firms ranging from Epson, Microsoft and Bank of America to local advertising agencies and travel websites. Four of my photos appeared in American City Calendar's Omaha calendar for 2012.

Apr 302017
 

Info Tables at the Boston Climate March
Big crowd at the Boston People’s Climate Mobilization

Thousands gathered on Boston Common for the Boston People’s Climate Mobilization on a beautiful April Day. And in Washington D.C., about 200,000 marched in “sweltering,” 90+ degree heat for the main People’s Climate March (including lots of Bostonians who made the trip). Sister marches were held in about 300 cites in the U.S. and 600 cites, total, worldwide. Which is all the more impressive as the Climate Marches took place just a week after the Marches for Science in D.C., Boston, and hundreds of cities around the world.

Big Crowd for the Boston Climate March

Oil Spills Kill

No Science, No Truth | Know Science,Know Truth

The Earth Does Not Have Four YearsNice Day at the Boston Climate March

Denial is DangerousLots of Kids at the Boston Climate March

Boston Climate March Panorama

At the Bandstand

Bethel AME Church Rev. Mariama White-Hammond at the Bandstand

See the full set here, on Flickr.

Apr 042017
 

The Durham (Omaha Union Station) at Twilight
Omaha Union Station at Twilight

On January 11, 2017, the Secretary of the U.S. Department of the Interior designated Omaha Union Station (listed on the National Registry of Historic Places since 1971) a National Historic Landmark. Which is kind of a big deal: only about 2,500 of the more than 85,000 sites on the National Register of Historic Places are designated National Historic Landmarks.

I’ve shot this magnificent example of Art Deco architecture before, but wanted to highlight its new status with this post. Interior’s January designation noted that the Station “is one of the most distinctive and complete examples of Art Deco architecture in the nation . . . [and] outstandingly expresses the style’s innovative and diverse surface ornamentation inspired by the machine age.” That surface ornamentation includes the heroic female and male railroad worker bas-relief sculptures seen in the photos below (and close up here and here). The station’s great hall boasts a 60 foot high, sculpted plaster ceiling with gold and silver leaf trim, a terrazzo floor including marvelous starbust patterns, and impressive 13-foot tall chandeliers. See here for more on the station’s history and architecture.

Omaha Union Station (10th Street entrance façade)
Omaha Union Station (south entrance)

Designed by architect Gilbert Stanley Underwood in 1929, Omaha Union Station opened in 1931. In addition to other rail stations and federal buildings such as the San Francisco Mint, Underwood is known for designing landmark lodges and hotels in many National Parks, including Yellowstone, Bryce, Grand Teton, and Yosemite (there the famous Ahwahnee Hotel, currently embroiled in a trademark dispute over rights to its name, but that’s another story).

mimic and pose

Blue Hour at the Durham (Union Station)

The designated landmark is actually the third Omaha Union Station at the site and replaced the second Union Station built adjacent to the historic 10th Street bridge in 1899. Omaha Burlington Station—first opened in 1898 across the rail yard from Union Station—also served passengers in the busy Omaha rail hub of the first half of the 20th Century, the fourth largest in the country. Union Station alone served about 10,000 passengers per day in the 1940s. Passenger rail service declined drastically starting in the mid-1950s, and both Omaha Union Station and Burlington Station closed in the early 1970s when a new Amtrak station opened nearby.

Donated by Union Pacific to the City of Omaha, Union Station now houses the Durham Museum. As noted on the museum’s website, the Durham showcases everything from permanent exhibits highlighting the history of Omaha and its surrounding regions, to traveling exhibitions from the museum’s national partners including the Smithsonian, the National Archives, the Library of Congress, and the Field Museum.

 

To Trains

Inside Omaha Union Station

Soda Fountain
Setting Sun Illuminates Union Station Lights and Flags_final
Setting Sun Illuminates Union Station Lights and Flags

A full set of two dozen photos of Omaha Union Station I’ve shot over the years may be seen here, on Flickr.

 

Mar 152017
 

High Winds and Wintery Mix with Twig Litter
High Winds and Wintry Mix with Twig Litter

A snow day in March. The Nor’easter that hit the east cost only dumped several inches of snow on Boston before becoming a wintry mix when I ventured out, camera in tow. The wind-whipped, freezing rain gradually turned to just plain old rain and made for a camera-soaking (good thing for weather-sealed equipment), and not exactly pleasant, afternoon stroll. It was a lot more fun being out during the snow day in February.

I manged to get a few decent shots, however. Unfortunately, the slush and soggy snow will freeze overnight.

rain drops on the branches after the snow
rain drops on the branches after the snow (better large)

Christian Science Church in the Storm
Christian Science Church in the Storm (better large)

frozen rain drops
frozen rain drops

Taking cover from the freezing rain to change lenses
taking cover from the freezing rain to change lenses

Mar 102017
 

Meatpacking District Gentrification Reflections
Reflecting on Meatpacking District Gentrification

A second and final set of photos from a recent trip to New York City. The first set featured black and white images, while this set showcases NYC in all its many colors. Featured here, as before, are shots from a walk to and from Penn Station to the West Village via the High Line, and another post-brunch, Sunday walk through the Meatpacking District and Chelsea.

Not Scary
Not Scary

This framing isolating scary takes the piece of public art out of context, but I like the message (and composition) of the photo. Here’s the full piece of art on the High Line, shot last August:

Blind Idealism is Deadly

The High Line, which I’ve shot a couple of times before, is an urban greenway—-a former elevated freight rail line transformed into a park and trail that runs from the West Village and Meatpacking District through Chelsea, ending beyond Penn Station.

High Line and Hotel Rooftop Sunset Crowds
High Line and Hotel Rooftop Sunset Crowds

Magic Hour Behind Chelsea Market
Magic Hour Behind Chelsea Market

New York in all its colors
New York in All its Colors

like port holes
Like Port Holes

LEN(wich)

Dos Caminos

SushiSushi (and art on the High Line)

 

The full set may be seen here, on Flickr.

 

Mar 042017
 

the sun illuminates and the wind whips the flags_new final
the sun illuminates and the wind whips the flags

Some street and architecture photos from a President’s Day trip to New York, shot with the Olympus Pen F monochrome mode.  This set includes photos shot from three different walks, including to and from Penn Station to the West Village via the High Line, and another post-brunch, Sunday walk through the Meatpacking District and Chelsea.

 

The Dry Cleaning Company

 

Bond Paige & Lumas

Sun Dappled P. F. Collier & Son

I’ve also included a couple of iPhone photos from the train, looking toward a hazy Manhattan skyline from Queens. These turned out to be relatively striking shots, with the winter sun getting low in the sky.

hazy afternoon skyline

NYC Sykline from the Train

The High Line, which I’ve shot a couple of times before, is an urban greenway—-a former elevated freight rail line transformed into a park and trail that runs from the West Village and Meatpacking District through Chelsea, ending beyond Penn Station.

Milk

. . . Swift Completion of Their Appointed Rounds

MTA Rail YardGainsvort Constructionsez WiredHigh Line Cellist

empire state

The full set may be seen here, on Flickr.

Feb 242017
 

The Log Cabin
The Log Cabin and the Jones Street Footbridge

Some final photos from a late December walk in Omaha’s Elmwood Park. I already posted a set of photos from a frosty Christmas walk through Elmwood Park. The photos here were shot  several days later when the low-hanging, late-afternoon sun cast long shadows and  bathed trees and buildings in a warm yellow glow.  Oh, and regarding the above photo (and one below), check out these recent posts in Miss Cassette’s excellent My Omaha Obsession on the same subject: Mysteries of Omaha: The Log Cabin and the Jones Street Bridge (part 1) and part 2.

fence posts and shadow lines
fence posts and shadow lines

Elmwood Park Pavilion in the late afternoon sun
Elmwood Park Pavilion in the late afternoon sun

Creativity
Creativity

In addition to sanctioned urban art in the park exemplified by the above photo, local kids have kept alive the long-standing tradition of decorating the environs underneath the Jones Street bridge with graffiti and creative urban art, especially on logs around the trails underneath, as I commented on the above mentioned My Omaha Obsession post.

F*CK 50

Graffiti also shows up in the tunnel under the stone bridge in the Elmwood Park Grotto. But I believe such tunnel art is ephemeral because the City routinely paints it over (not a good backdrop for all the wedding photographers who pose wedding parties in the Grotto).

tunnel graffiti
tunnel graffiti

Jones Street Footbridge (without snow)
Jones Street Footbridge in Winter (without snow)

Elmwood Creek (with trail)_final
Elmwood Creek (with trail)

Happy trails.

Feb 172017
 

Elmwood Park frost and mist
Elmwood Park frost and mist

I’m finally getting around to posting some photos from late December, the last set of shots from a holiday visit to my hometown.  Although I posted other photos from the trip a few weeks ago, this last set was delayed because of other photoblog post-worthy events (e.g. the yuuge Boston Women’s March, a large rally against Trump’s immigrant and travel ban and a recent snow day).

In any event, here are a few photos from a foggy Christmas morning walk. Covered in frost, Omaha’s Elmwood Park looked beautiful, even as the frost started to melt toward the end of the walk and the icy mist began to dissipate.

out for a walk in the icy mist
out for a walk in the icy mist

Frosty mist in Elmwood Park
Elmwood Park from the Jones Street footbridge

light fog across the parktrees and trail in the midst of the frosty mistpark bench and pavilionElmwood Park Frosted

pastoral noir
pastoral noir

Hiking Behind the Bridge in Elmwood Park
Hiking Behind the Bridge in Elmwood Park

the full set may be seen here on Flickr.

Feb 112017
 

Charlie's Sandwich Shoppe
Charlie’s Sandwich Shoppe

First snow day of the winter.  A large storm pounded the east coast, creating blizzard conditions in Boston for about five hours.  Although the snowfall was very heavy at the height of the storm, we only ended up with about a foot of snow in the city.  And more snow is in store for this weekend, but it will likely change to rain.  Up until now, we’ve had very little snow and are far removed from the massive winter two years ago, the total snowfall for which was 110 inches.  And most of that fell in a relentless series of storms from late January through early March.

But back to this storm.  It was fun to be out in the height of the snowfall, walking around my neighborhood.  The streets were basically deserted but for snowplows.  Most shops, cafes and restaurants were closed.  Very few people were out and about, except for kids sledding in Sparrow Park a block away from my house, and a few souls out walking dogs or just enjoying the blizzard.

Snow Day Sledding in Titus Sparrow Park
Snow Day Sledding in Titus Sparrow Park

Snow on the block
snow piling up on the block

Stone Cold Harriet Tubman
Stone Cold Harriet Tubman (Harriet Tubman Memorial and Park)

snowing heavily outside my door
Southwest Corridor Park, steps from my door

out for a walk
out for a walk

The full set of photos may be seen here, on Flickr.

Jan 292017
 

Not this time
Not This Time

More than 20,000 people protested in Boston’s Copley Square against Trump’s immigrant ban on Sunday, January 30, 2017. This demonstration followed the large and spontaneous protest at Boston’s Logan Airport Saturday night. Late Saturday and very early Sunday morning (2:00AM) federal judges in New York and Boston, respectively, temporarily blocked Trump’s immigration ban, pending full hearing at later dates in February.

For more on Sunday’s demonstration in Copley Square, see this Boston Globe video and article.

Copley Square Protest Against Trump's Muslim Ban

The US was Founded by Immigrants & Protects Religious Freedom

Copley Square Sunday Jan 29th

We Demand Justice

First They Came for the Muslims and I Said NOT THIS TIMEFirst They Came for the Muslims and I Said NOT THIS TIME

Full set of photos may be seen here on Flickr.

Jan 282017
 

photo-chuk-stewart-chuck-eric-dolphy-1964
Eric Dolphy, 1964 © Chuck Stewart

Legendary photographer Chuck Stewart died last week, although the news of his death just became widely known yesterday. Stewart shot more than two thousand album covers and is best known for his work with jazz musicians. Many of his photos, like the shot of Eric Dolphy, above, are now among the best known and most iconic images of the artists depicted.

In 2014, Stewart donated 25 images of John Coltrane and Alice Coltrane to the Smithsonian Institution’s National Museum of American History, including several shot during the sessions for A Love Supreme. See this WBUR, Boston, story about Stewart’s photo donation to the Smithsonian, including this photo of John and Alice Coltrane:

john-coltrane-with-alice-coltrane-van-gelder-studio-englewood-cliffs-nj-1966-photo-chuk-stewart
John and Alice Coltrane, 1966 © Chuck Stewart

quincy-jones-photo-chuk-stewart-a1
Quincy Jones © Chuck Stewart

Here are a just a few of his jazz album covers, courtesy of wikipedia commons:

Shepp4forTraneDear_John_CPSanders_TauhidLove_Crypharoahsanders-karmaAscensionArchie_Shepp_-_Attica_BluesThe Blues and the Abstract Truth Oliver Nelson

More of Stewart’s photos may be seen here in this Jazz In Photo blog.

 

Jan 222017
 

looking toward the stage
Looking toward the stage at the Boston Women’s March

About 175,000 gathered on Boston Common to hear Senators Elizabeth Warren and Ed Markey, Attorney General Maura Healey, Mayor Walsh, other elected officials, activists and musicians before the Boston Women’s March. One of about 675 marches around the world, with nearly 5 million participants, the Boston Women’s March was an amazing phenomenon. Here’s an aerial video of the huge Boston crowd shot by a local news affiliate. Although the official estimate was 175,000, event organizers say more than 200,000 souls were at the Boston march.

I arrived about a half hour before the event was scheduled to start and found one of the last open perches on the benches ringing the monument on the hill looking toward the stage (down near the corner of Beacon and Charles).  Not a bad place for photos, the monument was approximately in the middle of the huge crowd filling much of Boston Common.

Love Not Hate Makes America Great
Love Not Hate Makes America Great

We the People
We the People

Boston Women's March pre-march speakers about to get underway
10:45AM, Waiting for the Event to Begin

Misogyny, Racism & Ignorance Are Not Family Values
Misogyny, Racism & Ignorance Are Not Family Values

DicktatorWomen's Rights Are Human RightsSeven in a TreeColorfulBefore the Boston Women's MarchMonumental

The event started at 11AM and the march began around 1PM (the progression from cloudy morning to sunny afternoon can be seen in the two photos of the monument, above). Although the march through the Common, past the Public Garden and down Commonwealth Ave and back was short, the last marchers didn’t finish until about 4PM given the size of the crowd.

Commonwealth Ave is Bursting at the Seams
Commonwealth Ave is Bursting at the Seams

Love Trumps Hate
Love Trumps Hate

Long Shadows
Late Afternoon Long Shadows

Marching Down Beacon StreetMarching Down Both Sides of Commonwealth Ave
Orange Trump Voodoo DollFull set of my photos of the Boston Women’s March may be seen here on Flickr.