Apr 212013
 

Reflecting on a tragic day in Boston
The “mother church” and reflecting pool at the Christian Science Center

The horrific bombings at the Boston Marathon happened just a few blocks from my apartment. I was outside and got a few iPhone shots, but then my block was on lock down and I couldn’t get back home until about 7PM. When I finally was allowed in, I grabbed my m4/3 camera (an Olympus Pen E-P3) and headed back out to take some sunset shots at the CSC reflecting pool.  This peaceful, tranquil, twilight place–just about 8 blocks or so from the site of the Marathon bombings– was a good place  to reflect on a very tragic day in my city.  The afternoon after the bombing, Getty Images picked up this photo for editorial licensing. I guess it’s a different take on a tragic day that could be of interest for editorial and news use in print or online. Thoughts and prayers go out to all the victims and their friends and families.

The day after the bombing was chilly, dreary and very blustery. Not at all pleasant and it heightened the anxious mood. But the next day was gorgeous.  Warm weather really made the Magnolia trees blossoms on my block burst full blown, as seen below. Very welcome explosions compared to those in my neighborhood two days before. This is a quick iPhone capture taken as the sun lowered near the horizon. It’s amazing how much the weather changing overnight to turn into one of the sunniest, most gorgeous Spring days yet can help boost feelings of hope, resilience and renewal. Happy Spring!

Welcome Explosions

 

Apr 192013
 

a day in the neighborhood

The horrific bombings at the Boston Marathon happened just a few blocks from my apartment. I was outside and got a few iPhone shots, including some of those below, but then my block was on lock down and I couldn’t get back home until about 7PM. Three people lost their lives in the bombing (including an 8 year old boy), and about 175 people were injured — many severely, including several who lost legs or parts of legs and will face a difficult recovery.  Thoughts and prayers go out to all the victims and their friends and families.  Also included in the set below are a few iPhone shots of one of the memorials that’s sprung up around the barricades blocking a six block stretch of Boylston Street, the center of which is the marathon finish line.


A group from my office observed a moment of silence at 2:50PM the day after the bombing at the nearby Garden of Peace: A Memorial For Victims of Homicide. It’s a lovely park with natural grasses and a stream made up of stones. Many (too many) of the stones are engraved with the names and dates of Boston homicide victims –each a small memorial and symbolic tombstone. Obviously a good place to meet with colleagues and mourn and honor the victims. And to help each other heal the day after our city and one of its best known and iconic international events was ripped apart. It was quite emotional. One co-worker wore her Boston Marathon jacket. One entrance notes that “The Garden is a symbol of hope for peace and renewal in our lives, our community, and the world.” That spoke volumes the day after the bombings.  And it still does today.   Later that evening, a large group began to gather on Boston Common at sunset to hold a peace rally.  The crowd grew as the night descended and the gathering turned into a candlelight vigil for the victims.  Peace.